Knowledge Base

Find FAQs and other information in these articles published by an expert.

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The easiest way to view and pay your bills is to log into AGL Energy Online. Otherwise, you can use our secure online bill payment page to pay online with a Visa or MasterCard. Credit cards are charged a payment processing fee fee which will show up on your next bill. You can view the Payment Processing Fee amount in your relevant state’s Fee Schedule. You can also register to receive your bills through BPAY View so you can receive, manage and pay them from your financial institution's internet banking website. Visit bpay.com.au for more information. You can find more information about Billing and Payments in Help and Support.    
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If you pay your energy bills using a credit card, or any card that uses a credit card payment facility, AGL is charged a merchant services fee by your financial institution. This will appear on your next bill as ‘payment processing fee’. You can view the Payment Processing Fee amount in your relevant state’s Fee Schedule. There are other methods for paying your energy bills with AGL that won’t incur a payment processing fee, which you can learn about in the Billing and Payments section of Help and Support.
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Solar Command Check is a daily update, based on your home’s smart meter data for the previous 30 days, to let you know if your system is producing solar energy or if we think there might be a problem. To do this we estimate your solar energy production, compare it against expected production for a system of your size, age, location, and provide an indication of its performance.   This is only an estimate due to the limited amount of information we have about your system.   Solar Command is a real time solar monitoring subscription service. It remotely monitors your system’s energy production and household energy consumption, calculates your estimated savings, shows how much solar or grid energy you used, and provides this all via a personalised dashboard. If you subscribe to Solar Command, AGL installs a device on your switchboard to read and record the data required to provide you with this insight.   Details about Solar Command can be found here.
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An amber status means your system is producing a lot less solar energy than we expected and there may be a problem with your system. There could be several reasons for this, so we’ve provided this useful guide with steps to identify and resolve any faults.   Once a fault is resolved, you may still see the amber status for up to 30 days as your data continues to be processed.
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To calculate your solar status we take into account your system details (system size, number of panels and year of installation) and your net import and export energy data from your home’s smart meter for the last 30 days. We then continuously run this data through patented algorithms and other reference data sets to provide you with an estimate of how your system has been performing for the last 30 days in comparison to what we expected.
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Solar Command Check is available to eligible customers via My Account.   To be eligible you must be an AGL customer, have a solar system installed at your premise, have a smart meter and we must have 30+ days of data from that smart meter.   When signing up for Solar Command Check you will need to provide details about your solar system size, number of panels and year of installation.   My Account is AGL’s online portal for the management of your energy account – you can view and pay your bill, track energy use and update your details. If you are not already signed up to My Account you can do that here.
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Solar Command Check is a daily solar health check, based on your home’s smart meter data for the previous 30 days. It’s lets you know if your system is producing solar energy or if we think there might be a problem via the presentation of two status: Green or Amber.   Green means your panels are producing solar energy and Amber indicates there could be a problem with your system. In both instances we provide support and guidance about how to maintain your system to maximise your investment or advice on how to resolve any problems.
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Digital meter data is secure and confidential. AGL and our metering service providers must adhere to tight privacy controls and compliance with the Privacy Act Cth. (1988) and the Australian Privacy Principles, which cover the collection, use, disclosure and storage of personal information.
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Digital meters and their communication networks are equipped with advanced security features that prevent unauthorised access.   The wireless links between digital meters and retailers like AGL are encrypted and can’t be disabled. These links do not use the internet, providing further security.   No customer names or addresses are attached to the transmission of metering data. The meter serial number and National Metering Identifier (NMI) are matched up with customer information only after it has reached the central data station, which is hardened and secured.
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Digital meter data is secure and confidential. There are strict guidelines in place for the protection of this information, whether it’s collected from your existing meter or a digital meter. The collection, use and disclosure of metering data is also subject to strict confidentiality rules, and access to electricity usage data and other information is restricted.   By law, metering data can only be accessed by customers, the meter reader, your energy retailer and others who are entitled to it (e.g. authorised bodies, distribution networks or third party service providers with your consent).   AGL and other retailers must comply with the Privacy Act Cth. (1988), which includes the National Australian Privacy Principles; these principles set clear restrictions on the use, disclosure and storage of personal information.
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AGL and other retailers are required to notify customers if a disconnection due to debt may occur. If you’re experiencing financial difficulties and have trouble paying your electricity bill on time, please contact us as soon as possible. AGL’s hardship program, ‘Staying Connected’, is designed to assist customers who are having a hard time paying their energy bills. Visit our Staying Connected page for more details.
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If you’re experiencing issues which you think are due to your digital meter, contact us and we’ll investigate.
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Yes – a digital meter installation can still proceed, however the meter technician will need to test the strength of the telecommunications signal to your property. If the signal is found to be too weak to deliver remote services (such as meter readings) to your home, the wireless communications signal may need to be switched off and alternative arrangements put in place. We’ll discuss these alternative arrangements with you if they’re necessary. 
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All wiring issues associated with the circuitry in the home, the switchboard and the meter box are the responsibility of the homeowner. If a site defect has been discovered at your home, get in touch with your landlord or real estate agency and ask them to address the problem. AGL can guide you through the process.  
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Once AGL has confirmed details of a digital meter installation at your property, a qualified electrical installer will be sent to complete the installation. Sometimes during the process, an issue (commonly called a ‘site defect’) is discovered which prevents the installer from continuing immediately with the job. This could include the discovery of electrical issues or on-site contaminants, like asbestos. If this occurs, the meter installer will provide you with information outlining the site defect, why it prevented installation, who is responsible for rectification works and who you should contact to discuss the matter further.    Note that wiring issues associated with the circuitry in the home, the switchboard and the meter box remain the responsibility of the homeowner. 
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Digital meters are not dangerous. All digital meters installed are regulated by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) and have frequencies similar to common household electronics like mobile phones and televisions. The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) sets exposure limits and concludes that ‘no scientific evidence exists that low levels of radio-frequency electromagnetic energy exposure from digital meters causes any health effects or symptoms of ill-’1. 1 http://www.arpansa.gov.au/RadiationProtection/Factsheets/is_smartmeters.cfm   For more information, visit:   NSW: Are smart meters dangerous to my health? SA: Smart Meters QLD: Digital Meters 
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Yes - All digital meters meet the electro-magnetic exposure limits set by the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) and enforced by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA). Digital meters have lower emissions than many other electrical devices commonly found in households, such as mobile and cordless phones, Wi-Fi modems, microwaves, televisions, and baby monitors.   All digital meters being installed meet current Australian Standards including those related to safety.
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No – your digital meter operates at a low frequency and power level; it will not interfere with any other equipment in your home.
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Yes - digital meters are equipped with remote functionality to disconnect and reconnect, as well as features to protect against hazards such as electric shock and fire damage.
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Yes – having a digital meter should not prevent you from transferring to another retailer.  If you experience any difficulties, start by contacting your existing retailer.   If you continue to experience transfer issues, the independent Ombudsmen in your State may be able to help. 
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