Gas Import Jetty & Pipeline Discussion

Welcome!

Welcome!

Highlighted

Welcome!

AGL Moderator

This discussion forum is one of the ways you can provide feedback on the Gas Import Jetty & Pipeline Project while it undergoes an Environment Effects Statement (EES).

It's a place to share your local knowledge, thoughts and feedback and to ask questions to better understand the project or issues that concern you.

We’ll be setting up a number of posts that will ask for your feedback. Please reply underneath and share your opinion in as much detail as possible. Feel free to comment on as many posts as you like.

You can also post any additional concerns, questions or ideas outside of the topics we post in this group.

The group is visible to anyone. To post a comment you must provide an email address to join as a member of the group. Your privacy is important to us and we will keep your information safe, in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

Remember, your feedback is important to inform the project design and our technical studies. By participating in this discussion, your comments and concerns will be formally captured and fed into the EES process.

We look forward to hearing from you!

11 REPLIES 11

Re: Welcome!

I am a very experienced strategic planner, and familiar with EES processes and the Western Port area.  I am also an Independent Candidate for Kooyong in the May Federal election.  For more than a decade, I have been active in addressing climate change and the actions needed to deal with it - in the face of the inability of energy managers, producers and retailers - and politicians in the three main parties - to effectively deal with what has become a very serious challenge indeed.

 

We are not short of gas, and in any case gas is a major contributor to greenhouse pollution albeit less than coal.  I do not understand the logic of the AGL proposal: we export a large quantity of gas, which is the direct cause of inordinate price rises for local industrial and residential consumers.  We then need to import gas???  This does not make any economic or environmental sense.  Please explain!

Re: Welcome!

Starter

AGLs plan to import gas through Westernport is a bad idea. Westernport is one of Australia"s finer marine features with significant mangrove areas, abundant sealife and fishing opportunities.

As a keen snorkeller and diver I have spent significant time inits waters.

AGL can certainly find sites more suited to its purposes.

Please do.

 

Not Welcome

Sparky

I just wish you would invest the money and resources you have allocated for this dreadful gas import system to a renewable source of energy and supply the general public with an alternate energy source that does not pollute. Is this not your company's business, to supply energy? Why not make investment into renewable, non polluting, environmentally sensitive systems - it is going to have to  be done or not even your profits will be of use to you to anyone if we have no environment to support life.

Your proposed plan for Westernport is so environmentally insensitive because:

- likely significant impacts on Westernport Bay marine life, flora, fauna and mangroves due to the Gas Import Jetty project

- degradation of marine environment due to water induction and expulsion required for your cooling system

- the polluting nature of ship's emissions

- potential risks to the health, well-being and safety of Crib Point residents due to storage of LNG near residential area

- likely significant impacts on international migratory species including birds and whales around Westernport Bay

- potential impacts of the Pipeline properties including future valuations

- removal of numerous established trees in and around Hastings and life disruption during Pipeline construction - you will basically be digging up the town

- loss of over 4ha of protected habitat in Warringine Park due to 30 metre construction easement from Crib Point to Pakenham

Tags (2)

Re: Welcome!

Sparky

Would you also like to comment on how the track record of AGL penalties assures the public you will even do what you say you are going to do in the way that you outline - see list of previous penalties attached

Re: Welcome!

AGL Employee

Hi PeterDibbs,

 

We are very aware of local concerns about the potential impacts of the project. We fully recognise these concerns and the strongly held views about the unique environmental significance of Westernport and in particular, the marine life.

 

Others in the community have also made their concerns known to the government and they have been successful in making sure they are now assessed independently through an environment effects statement (EES) process.

 

The Minister for Planning Richard Wynne said “The EES will investigate the proposal’s effects on native vegetation, wildlife and marine life as well as Aboriginal cultural heritage areas.” Within this, the potential impact this project will have on threatened and migratory species will be assessed (See s4.2 of the scoping requirements).

 

You can view the scoping requirements on the department’s website here.

 

We understand that Western Port is a very popular area for recreational fishing. The mooring of the FSRU at the jetty would see a more rigid enforcement of the current exclusion zones for the existing petroleum import operations and would affect some access to the foreshore.

 

Recreational use of Western Port will be affected only when LNG tankers are berthing. At those times through traffic will be restricted to allow tugs to safely berth LNG carriers but this already occurs when ships visit the United Energy, BlueScope and Esso facilities. As the FSRU would be moored more than 500m off the shore, access to Woolley’s Beach Reserve is not expected to be affected.  

 

As part of this project, AGL will not be removing mangroves. The preliminary assessments suggest this project will have ‘negligible’ impact on mangroves and other seagrass. However, we are still required to undergo an EES. In the scoping requirements for the EES, the Biodiversity assessment in s.4.2 requires the direct loss of any associated listed threatened flora and fauna species and communities known or likely to occur in or adjacent to the project works.

 

We are in a difficult position because our customers are also going to be very concerned if we don’t supply them with gas. 

 

We will follow all assessment requirements deemed necessary by the government and regulatory bodies and are willing to be held to these standards.

 

The AGL Board have also yet to make a decision to fully fund the proposed project.

Re: Not Welcome

AGL Employee

Hi @JoLane,

 

We’d just like to apologise for the delay in addressing your enquiry – we have received a large number of complex and detailed questions that we need to discuss with a few specialists.

 

This is not the way we want to deal with community concerns and we’re working to be more responsive in the future.

 

We’ll respond to your question shortly.

 

Thanks,

Lachlan

Re: Not Welcome

AGL Employee

Hi @JoLane 

 

Australia is a major exporter of natural gas; however, most of this gas is not available to the south-eastern states. It has been a difficult realisation for many that the abundant gas supplies Victoria once enjoyed are in decline. Declining production from Bass Strait’s big legacy fields has meant Victoria needs to seriously consider and prepare for alternative sources of supply.


Even if the supply of gas from unconventional fields in Queensland was available to the pipeline connecting them with Victoria, Victoria would not be able to supply enough during peak winter gas demand due to the limited capacity of the pipeline. Gas supplies from the North West Shelf are not available to Victoria because there is no pipeline across the Nullarbor.

 

AGL is committed to helping shape a sustainable energy future for Australia.

 

We operate the country’s largest renewable electricity generation portfolio. We also operate the largest coal portfolio in Australia so we realise we are integral to the move out of non-renewable energy.

 

For us, gas is an enabler of energy transition. Over 80 per cent of electricity produced in Australia is sourced from the combustion of fossil fuels. Given the sheer scale, decarbonising the generation sector is likely to take several decades of replacing the existing generation fleet with low-emissions substitute technology such as solar and windfarms. To deliver reliable and sustainable energy at the lowest cost possible requires renewable energy from wind and solar combined with more flexible energy sources, like quick-start gas generation, that can be turned on whenever renewables are not available or don’t meet demand.

 

This mix of technologies can replace AGL’s Liddell coal plant when it closes, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 7.5 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent per annum. Reliable gas supply is a critical component of this replacement plan.

 

We know there are several environmental concerns that need to be addressed in detail as part of the assessment process, including those you have mentioned. The community have made their concerns known to the government and they have been successful in making sure they are now assessed independently through an Environment Effects Statement (EES) process.

 

These risks are being further investigated through the EES process. You can find details of this on the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning's website.

Re: Welcome!

AGL Employee

Hi @billchandler,

 

My sincere apologies for not addressing your enquiry sooner - we have had a large number of complex and detailed questions that required us to confer with a few specialists. 

 

This is not the way we want to deal with community concerns and we're working to be more responsive in the future. 

 

Australia is a major exporter of natural gas; however, most of this gas is not available to the south-eastern states. It has been a difficult realisation for many that the abundant gas supplies Victoria once enjoyed are in decline. Declining production from Bass Strait’s big legacy fields has meant Victoria needs to seriously consider and prepare for alternative sources of supply.

 

Even if the supply of gas from unconventional fields in Queensland was available to the pipeline connecting them with Victoria, Victoria would not be able to supply enough during peak winter gas demand due to the limited capacity of the pipeline. Gas supplies from the North West Shelf are not available to Victoria because there is no pipeline across the Nullarbor.

 

AGL is committed to helping shape a sustainable energy future for Australia.

 

We operate the country’s largest renewable electricity generation portfolio. We also operate the largest coal portfolio in Australia so we realise we are integral to the move out of non-renewable energy.

 

For us, gas is an enabler of energy transition. Over 80 per cent of electricity produced in Australia is sourced from the combustion of fossil fuels. Given the sheer scale, decarbonising the generation sector is likely to take several decades of replacing the existing generation fleet with low-emissions substitute technology such as solar and windfarms. To deliver reliable and sustainable energy at the lowest cost possible requires renewable energy from wind and solar combined with more flexible energy sources, like quick-start gas generation, that can be turned on whenever renewables are not available or don’t meet demand.

 

This mix of technologies can replace AGL’s Liddell coal plant when it closes, reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 7.5 million tonnes of CO2 equivalent per annum. Reliable gas supply is a critical component of this replacement plan.

 

We know there are several environmental concerns that need to be addressed in detail as part of the assessment process, including those you have mentioned. The community have made their concerns known to the government and they have been successful in making sure they are now assessed independently through an Environment Effects Statement (EES) process.

Re: Welcome!

AGL Employee

Hi @JoLane,

 

We understand your concern about our past behaviour. We need to do better.

 

All the breaches and fines you have referenced are publicly available and as a major ASX listed company our conduct is rightly subject to high levels of regulator, shareholder, customer and media scrutiny.

 

The breaches and the resulting fines are evidence that we are closely monitored, and action is taken by both regulators and AGL to address our past failures.  We are made accountable for our actions and we often take further action to ensure these types of issues don’t happen again.

 

In relation to the project, we are not expecting you to trust us and we recognise the community can’t simply take our word that safety and environmental risks will be well managed.

 

The purpose of the EES process is to independently assess if these risks can be addressed before the project is approved by the state government and many other regulators.

 

In addition to the EES, AGL will be subject to oversight by numerous regulators and government agencies, including: 

  • Environment Protection Authority Victoria
  • Australian Maritime Safety Authority
  • Transport Safety Victoria
  • Marine Safety Victoria
  • Office of Transport Safety (Cth)
  • Energy Safety Victoria
  • WorkSafe Victoria
  • Harbour Master
  • Victorian Regional Channels Authority
  • Port of Hastings Development Authority

The project also must adhere to several legislative requirements, including:

  • Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act)
  • Environmental Effects Act 1978
  • Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988
  • Victorian Advisory Lists
  • Planning and Environment Act 1987
  • Mornington Peninsula Planning Scheme
  • Guidelines for the removal, destruction or lopping of native vegetation (DELWP 2017a)
  • Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994 (CaLP Act)

 

The local community also play an important role to ensure we are accountable to the highest safety standards.

 

I hope goes part of the way in addressing your concerns?