Announcements and Miscellaneous

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  We are aware of an unsolicited email in circulation pretending to be from AGL containing the subject title: “AGL electricity bill”   How to identify whether you have received a legitimate or hoax email All legitimate AGL electricity bills will: Come from the sender address agl@energy.agl.com.au. Any deviation on this address may be a hoax email; and Include your supply address and account number in the email body. If it does not contain these details, it may be a hoax email. What to do if you believe you have received a hoax email If you have received a hoax email, please delete it. Do not click on any links or content from the email. If you are unsure or have any queries about the email, please contact us. AGL takes the security of your information very seriously. We will never send emails asking you to confirm, update or disclose personal or banking information. For information on how to identify a scam email head to this Knowledge Base article or the Scamwatch website. Any customers with concerns about the scam emails should contact us.  
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We are aware of hoax phone calls being made to customers claiming to be from AGL. These calls are advising customers that they must make a payment on their account or risk being disconnected within 30 minutes.   AGL takes the security of your information very seriously. Whilst AGL does contact customers to seek payment on overdue accounts, we will never threaten disconnection within an unreasonable timeframe if a payment cannot be made.   If you are unsure if a phone call was legitimately from AGL, please:    download the AGL App or go to My Account to check on your account balance, or contact us to discuss any outbound contact we might have had with you and any outstanding payments on your account.     If you have provided your details over the phone and believe you may have been a victim of fraud, please contact your financial institution immediately. Scamwatch has more information about what to do if you think your personal details have landed in the wrong hands.
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Learn to Spot Scams and Spam ......Look for something JUST NOT QUITE RIGHT! Phishing is a type of online scam where criminals send an email that appears to be from a legitimate company asking you to provide sensitive information or click on a link. Some phishing messages are an obvious fraud, others can be a bit more convincing. So how do you tell the difference between a real message and a phishing message. There is not one single technique but here are some hints.   1. The message contains a mismatched URL e.g. actual email address does not match name displayed   One of the first things you should check is whether the URL (eg. link to website or email address) actually matches the name displayed. When you hover your mouse over the link or email address if it is different to the address that you can see, the message is probably fraudulent or malicious. For example, if you hover over a display sender name like “Stay Smart Online” it should appear as StaySmartOnline@ag.gov.au, not something like StaySmartOnline123445656@123.com. 2. URLs contain a misleading domain name e.g. microsoft.com.maliciousdomain.com   Criminals who launch phishing campaigns often depend on people either - not checking a link before they click or not understanding how a domain name is structured. For example a Microsoft webpage would always have microsoft.com at the end. For example   info.microsoft.com This could be OK info.microsft.com.micosoft.com This is NOT OK (note the missing letters) 3. The message contains poor spelling and grammar If a company sends out a message, it is usually reviewed for spelling, grammar, and legality etc. So if a message is filled with poor grammar or spelling mistakes, it probably did not come from them! 4. The message asks for personal information   No matter how official an email message might look, it's always a bad sign if the message asks for personal information. Your bank does not need you to send it your account number. It already knows it! Also, a company should never send an email asking for your password or credit card number.   5. The offer seems too good to be true If the offer seems too good to be true - it probably is. If you receive a message from someone unknown to you making big promises e.g. you have won tattslotto - when you did not buy a ticket - the message is probably a scam. 6. You did not initiate the action   You get an email saying you won a car but you never entered a competition to win a car. If you get a message like this you can probably bet it is a scam. 7. You are asked to send money to cover expenses   A telltale sign of a phishing email is that you are asked for money - even if it is not in the first email.   8. The message makes unrealistic threats   If a message makes unrealistic threats it is probably a scam. An example of a threat message is - your bank emailing you saying that if you do not submit a form plus ID your account will be cancelled and assets seized.   9. The message appears to be from an official source e.g. government department   Official sources do not use email as their first form of contact. It will most probably be a scam.   10. Something just does not look right   Casino security teams are taught to look for anything that is JDLR - just doesn't look right! If it looks off, it probably is! This also applies to email messages. If you receive a message that seems suspicious, it's usually in your best interests to avoid acting on the message. Do not click on links, download files or open attachments in emails from unknown senders. It is best to open attachments only when you are expecting them and know what they contain, even if you know the sender.  
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We are aware of an unsolicited email in circulation pretending to be from AGL containing the subject title:   “Disconnection Notice”       How to identify whether you have received a legitimate or hoax email   All legitimate AGL disconnection notices will:   Come from the sender address agl@energy.agl.com.au. Any deviation on this address may be a hoax email; and Include your supply address and account number in the email body. If it does not contain these details, it may be a hoax email.   What to do if you believe you have received a hoax email   If you have received a hoax email, please delete it. Do not click on any links or content from the email. If you have clicked on the link and submitted your personal details, please login to these accounts and reset your password straight away and run a comprehensive Anti-Virus Scan. If you are unsure or have any queries about the email, please contact us. AGL takes the security of your information very seriously. We will never send emails asking you to confirm, update or disclose personal or banking information. For information on how to identify a scam email head to this Knowledge Base article or the Scamwatch website. Any customers with concerns about the scam emails should contact us.
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Customers and non-customers should be aware of an AGL-branded email scam that is  falsely claiming to be from AGL. The emails are presented as an eBill and may include a heading that includes "Credit card autopay rejection". Screenshots are posted below.   The link asking you to ‘re-register your credit card autopay details’ takes you to a non-AGL website which is a scam website.   AGL will never email you to ask for your personal banking or financial details.  Also, any email correspondence from AGL will also have the customer’s name and account details, including account number and supply address.   Anyone receiving this suspicious email should: Forward it to spam@agl.com.au. Flag the email as ‘spam’ or junk in your inbox. Delete the email immediately.   Please do not open or click on any links within the email.     For information on how to identify a scam email head to this Knowledge Base article or the Scamwatch website. Any customers with concerns about the scam emails should contact us    
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UPDATED 17th October 2017    We are aware of an issue that is affecting a number of our customers when trying to access their solar and electricity usage information through their My Account access. An example of this issue is shown below.    There appears to be a 2-5 day delay in the data that some customers are receiving. Our technical teams are investigating this at the moment and we will provide an update here as they unfold.      Thank you for your patience throughout this time, and please accept our sincere apologies for any inconvenience this has caused.                                                                         
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Recently, some QLD customers have received information regarding changes to their solar or controlled load metering charges with their annual rate review.    The Australian Energy Regulator (AER) has determined that metering charges should be separated from network charges to enable the competitive provision of metering services and provide greater transparency to customers for charging meter costs. Therefore, you’ll see a change on your bill where a solar or controlled load metering charge will be itemised along with your usage charges.   It’s important to note that this is not a new charge just a change to the way metering is charged and is passed through to you.   Visit the AGL website for more information on how energy is priced. If you would like to discuss these changes further, we encourage you to contact us.   
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We’re big believers in supporting the communities we operate in. So we’re proud to be a Premier Partner of the WCE and the AGL Aboriginal Leadership Program. It's a great opportunity to get involved and support the work of the club in the local community. See you at a game soon!
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Yes!   You can also chat online with us, and use our app to keep track of your usage and billing.   You can call us any time of day or night on 1300 001 190.
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Unfortunately, large areas are currently being affected by power outages due to recent storms and bushfires. While there is no power to your home, unless you have a battery backup system installed, your solar PV system will not be operational. Once the power comes on, please check the inverter to see if it’s functioning – if it’s not, please give us a call on 1300 377 118 (Option 2, Option 1) and we’ll be happy to assist.
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UPDATED: 21 November 2019   The ongoing bushfires in New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia are causing significant damage to the regions and we’ll be supporting impacted customers and employees during this difficult time. Find out how in our press release here.   If you have been impacted and you need help with your account please contact us here. The safety of our customers, the community and people are of paramount importance so if your home or business is in close proximity to the bushfires, please follow the advice of local authorities. If there’s a risk to life or property, please call 000. Visit NSW, Queensland or SA fire services for more information.
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We are aware of an unsolicited email in circulation pretending to be from AGL containing the subject title: “AGL electricity bill”     How to identify whether you have received a legitimate or hoax email   All legitimate AGL electricity bills will:   Come from the sender address agl@energy.agl.com.au. Any deviation on this address may be a hoax email; and Include your supply address and account number in the email body. If it does not contain these details, it may be a hoax email. What to do if you believe you have received a hoax email   If you have received a hoax email, please delete it. Do not click on any links or content from the email.   If you are unsure or have any queries about the email, please contact us.   AGL takes the security of your information very seriously. We will never send emails asking you to confirm, update or disclose personal or banking information.   For information on how to identify a scam email head to this Knowledge Base article or the Scamwatch website. Any customers with concerns about the scam emails should contact us.
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We're aware of a new round of hoax emails that are circulating currently. For more information head to this post.   Here is one iteration of the hoax bill:      
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